fbpx
  • Your local guide to food and drink on the Isle of Wight

Tasty Hot Cross Buns

Tasty Hot Cross Buns

Tasty Hot Cross Buns 2048 1536 The Editor

We heard it on the internet that you lot have been using ‘this time’ learning how to perfect your sourdough methods – well we’ve got something seasonal for you to try your hand at – why not get the kids involved to keep them out of trouble for a little while.

Jump to Recipe

This famous spiced seasonal bun can actually be found in supermarkets all year round down to its sheer popularity. Making them yourself is another flavour experience entirely. But have you ever wondered where they came from? Wholemeal_Hot_Cross_Bun_on_blue_and_white_plate

Apparently eating hot cross buns on Good Friday historically marks the end of Lent because they are made with dairy products which were forbidden during this period. 

The three core elements are symbolic to the Christan faith with the bread being the communion, the spices representing the spices that wrapped Jesus’ body in the tomb and then of course the cross of dough on the top representing the cross Jesus died on. 

Earliest records of the hot cross bun date as far back as the 1700s but there are theories they may have perhaps originated even earlier in 13th century Herefordshire. One story being a certain monk from St Albans Abbey, Brother Thomas Rocliffe, developed a recipe for Alban Buns which he distributed to the poor on Good Friday. Another story for english folklore told buns baked on Good Friday would never go mouldy and were often seen as a good luck charm.

To give this recipe the Isle of Wight twist we used flour from Calbourne Watermill that we had left in the cupboard but you can get flour from Grace’s bakery too (as well as hot cross buns too if you’re not up to making them). We used Briddlesford milk and butter. Then of course local free range eggs – we used mums but you could get some from Bronwrigg’s, Hazlemere Farm or Delicia Farm. Last but not least because we think this ingredient is what makes this recipe truly special is the Honey – we used Bunbury Bees cos we live in Newport but the best is the honey that is local to you.

You can get a lot of these ingredients at the local farm shops, greengrocers, butchers many of whom are still delivering – you can check out this handy Island survival guide here or head to tasteofthewight.co.uk/open

Tasty Hot Crossed Buns

This famous spiced seasonal bun can actually be found in supermarkets all year round down to its sheer popularity. Making them yourself is another flavour experience entirely.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Dough Prooving Time30 mins
Servings: 12 Buns

Ingredients

  • 2 7g sachet dried yeast
  • 455 g strong bread flour (plus extra for dusting)
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp mixed spice
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp nutmeg
  • 55 g caster sugar
  • 100 g mincemeat
  • 1 large free range egg
  • 2 tbsp plain flour
  • 55 g sultanas or raisins
  • 30 g dried cranberries
  • 2 tbsp mixed peel
  • 2 tbsp runny honey (to glaze)
  • 200 ml semi-skimmed milk
  • 55 g unsalted butter
  • 50 ml water

Instructions

  • Add the milk and 50ml water to a small pan and place over a low heat for a few minutes, or until slightly warm
  • Add the butter to a separate pan and place over a low heat for a few minutes, or until melted, then set aside.
  • Transfer the warmed milk mixture to a medium bowl and stir in the yeast. Set aside.
  • Sift the flour into a large bowl, then add the salt, spices and sugar, then stir the mincemeat into the mix.
  • Make a well in the centre and pour in the melted butter, followed by the yeast mixture. In a separate bowl, beat the egg then add it to the mixture.
  • Using a fork, mix well until you have a rough dough, then transfer to a clean flour dusted work surface and knead for 10 minutes, or until soft and springy.
  • Return the dough to a flour dusted bowl, cover with cling film and leave to rise in a warm place for an hour, or until doubled in size.
  • Transfer the dough to a clean, flour dusted work surface. Knock the air out by bashing it with your fist, then sprinkle over the dried fruit and mixed peel and knead into the dough.
  • Preheat the oven to 190°C. Grease and line a large baking tray.
  • Divide the dough into 12 equal pieces and roll each into balls. Evenly space them out on a lined baking tray as you go.
  • Cover with cling film and leave in a warm place for a further 30 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, place the plain flour and 2 tbsp water into a small bowl and mix to a thick paste.
  • Gently pat down the risen buns then use the batter to carefully trace a cross over the top with a spoon.
  • Place the buns into the preheated oven for 20 minutes, or until golden brown.
  • Transfer to a wire cooling rack, brush over a little honey and leave to cool.
  • Slice open the sticky hot cross buns, spread with a little butter and serve.

Notes

These are great served from the oven warm but if you manage to have a few hanging around any longer, then toast them and of course serve with butter.





The Editor

Taste of the Wight is the Isle of Wight’s free local guide to food and drink. Now in its fifth year, it has cemented itself as the number one, independent companion for eating out on the Island.

More stories by The Editor

Get the Magazine

Sign up for the Taste Newsletter


Taste of the Wight is the Isle of Wight’s free local guide to food and drink. Now in its sixth year, it has cemented itself as the number one, independent companion for eating out on the Island.